Wordless Wednesday (04/01/2015)

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About tyler4turtles

I am an avid photographer, poet, ecologist, bookworm, blogger, art enthusiast and runner who calls Montana home but lives in Oregon.
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14 Responses to Wordless Wednesday (04/01/2015)

  1. Ompong says:

    Looks like a “fountain pen” at first glance… Is it a specie of a stick-like insect? First time I saw it… Thanks for sharing!

    • You are most welcome, my friend! It’s my pleasure. Glad you enjoyed my photo! This macroinvertebrate is a beautiful salmon fly ๐Ÿ˜Š Have a great day/night!
      Cheers,
      Tyler

    • Thank you kindly, Thomas! I’m glad you enjoyed it, my friend ๐Ÿ™‚

      While at Knowles Creek, I found this adult salmon fly (Pteronarcys californica) hanging out on top of the smolt trap. Salmon flies are freshwater insects that belong to the order Plecoptera , which means “braided-wings” in ancient Greek. This species of giant stonefly hatches in April or May during the peak of spring runoff. At the nymph stage, they are aquatic and undergo 12 to 33 molts before emerging and becoming terrestrial adults one to four years later. Adults are clumsy fliers and often short-lived, eaten by robins or swallows. Salmon and trout feed on nymphs as they migrate to and from the shore at night each year to molt and lay their eggs. Stoneflies cannot tolerate water pollution and their presence is an indicator of good to excellent water quality.

      Have a wonderful Easter weekend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler

  2. A salmon fly? I had never heard of this until now. Enjoy your weekend.

    • Thank you kindly, my friend!

      While at Knowles Creek, I found this adult salmon fly (Pteronarcys californica) hanging out on top of the smolt trap. Salmon flies are freshwater insects that belong to the order Plecoptera , which means “braided-wings” in ancient Greek. This species of giant stonefly hatches in April or May during the peak of spring runoff. At the nymph stage, they are aquatic and undergo 12 to 33 molts before emerging and becoming terrestrial adults one to four years later. Adults are clumsy fliers and often short-lived, eaten by robins or swallows. Salmon and trout feed on nymphs as they migrate to and from the shore at night each year to molt and lay their eggs. Stoneflies cannot tolerate water pollution and their presence is an indicator of good to excellent water quality.

      Have a wonderful weekend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler

  3. Amy says:

    Wonderful macro shot!

    • Thank you kindly, Amy! I’m glad you enjoyed it, my friend ๐Ÿ™‚

      While at Knowles Creek, I found this adult salmon fly (Pteronarcys californica) hanging out on top of the smolt trap. Salmon flies are freshwater insects that belong to the order Plecoptera , which means “braided-wings” in ancient Greek. This species of giant stonefly hatches in April or May during the peak of spring runoff. At the nymph stage, they are aquatic and undergo 12 to 33 molts before emerging and becoming terrestrial adults one to four years later. Adults are clumsy fliers and often short-lived, eaten by robins or swallows. Salmon and trout feed on nymphs as they migrate to and from the shore at night each year to molt and lay their eggs. Stoneflies cannot tolerate water pollution and their presence is an indicator of good to excellent water quality.

      I hope you have wonderful Easter weekend, my friend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. The Gold Bug. Having thought of that, I immediately thought of Edgar Allan Poe. โ€“Curt

    • Excellent! I love that story by Poe ๐Ÿ™‚ An apt comparison. Salmon flies are freshwater insects that belong to the order Plecoptera , which means “braided-wings” in ancient Greek. This species of giant stonefly hatches in April or May during the peak of spring runoff. At the nymph stage, they are aquatic and undergo 12 to 33 molts before emerging and becoming terrestrial adults one to four years later. Adults are clumsy fliers and often short-lived, eaten by robins or swallows. Salmon and trout feed on nymphs as they migrate to and from the shore at night each year to molt and lay their eggs. Stoneflies cannot tolerate water pollution and their presence is an indicator of good to excellent water quality.

      Have a wonderful weekend, my friend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. Cool bug. I can imagine Poe being inspired by one. Good to know they are providing food for the salmon and birds. ๐Ÿ™‚ I can’t think of better jobs for bugs. Except maybe pollinating. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Thank you kindly, Brenda! Every creature, great or small, has a place in this world. Remove one species of butterfly (or other pollinator) and the ecosystem suffers. It doesn’t take much to tip the scales, which is why I try to be respectful of every life, whether I like it or not. I’m really trying hard to be more respectful to spiders, but it’s proving to be very difficult ๐Ÿ˜‰ I hope you’re having a wonderful weekend, my friend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler ๐Ÿ™‚

      • I got a spider bite last summer when I was pruning a butterfly bush. I think the spider was probably more scared than I was, but my arm hurt for over a week! I’m guilty of many evil thoughts toward wolf spiders ever since. You are the better naturalist!

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