Hitchcock’s Soundtracks

Hitchcock's Soundtracks

My ear kisses
the ground as
train engine
tremors
tunnel
through
subconscious
Torn Curtain
compartments,
I Confess,
its whistle-blow
echoes a foreboding
Hitchcock
Psycho shower
soundtrack,
striking sharp spikes
like nails across the
chalkboard of my
heart of hearts,
hot and heavy
iron rails
pulsing
in parallel,
Strangers
On A Train
near Rear
Windows
peering at
passing
Birds
perched
on side-arm
switch
posts,
tipping
heads
towards
North
by Northwest
pathos,
sweaty
pistons
pumping
steam,
Blackmail
caffeine
fueling
Frenzy,
wheel rows
roundhouse
kicking
wicked
centripetal
forces,
backpedaling
breaks stop
on a dime,
saving
presidential
face,
except Abe’s,
as circular
scalpels
Sabotage
a pretty penny
for my
brain’s
boxcar
Bon Voyage
thoughts,
while
rhymes hit
Rushmore rocks
remembering
mixed up
Family
Plots,
Spellbound
Vertigo
on a
tight Rope
fears
The Man
Who Knew
Too Much.

About tyler4turtles

I am an avid photographer, poet, ecologist, bookworm, blogger, art enthusiast and runner who calls Montana home but lives in Oregon.
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26 Responses to Hitchcock’s Soundtracks

  1. Whoa! I may be off… but my first impression is: Ghost Train and the collective haunting whispers to not forget as there is The Story behind the story.

    Loved the photo and haunting poem as both struck a cord.

    • Thank you, Anna! Your interpretation is very well thought out and what you say rings true. For me, a train whistle unearths the mystery of our telltale hearts, rerouting our feelings before we know what hit us. Hope you are having a wonderful Friday and keep up the inspiring posts on your blog!
      Cheers,
      Tyler 🙂

  2. Bee says:

    love it

    • Thank you, Bee! My favorite Hitchcock movie is still ‘North by Northwest.’ While I love all of Hitchcock’s movies with Jimmy Stewart (e.g., Rope, Vertigo, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Rear Window), there is something about the chemistry between Cary Grant and Eva Marie-Saint that captivates my attention. Also, the suspenseful plot with changing scenery and keen dialogue, as well as the cinematography (esp. with Mount Rushmore and the crop duster), sets ‘North by Northwest’ apart from the rest. Glad you enjoyed my train of thought through classic cinema! Hope you have a wonderful day, my friend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler 🙂

  3. Shainbird says:

    Thrilling! Hitchcock is beyond all viewing experiences! Lovely composition!

    • Thank you, my friend! Glad you enjoyed my plunge into classic Hitchcock cinema. Hope you have a wonderful Friday and weekend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler 🙂

      • Shainbird says:

        Have you seen his Shadow of a Doubt?

      • Yes, it is an excellently directed, acted and scripted movie. It was nominated for an Academy Award in 1943 for Best Story. Joseph Cotton really nails his character and drives the suspenseful plot home. Is this your favorite Hitchcock film? Hope you are having a wonderful day and have a safe and relaxing 4th of July!
        Cheers,
        Tyler 🙂

      • Shainbird says:

        It is a great film in all aspects, I especially liked the character of Ann who was played by a real resident of Santa Rosa. And Cotten in a negative light is rare. They don’t make them like that anymore. Actually anything by Hitch is a favorite, it would be easier to list my least favorite. Happy Fourth Tyler!

  4. This is really great! I love it.

  5. Myaz_Nuggetz says:

    Reblogged this on Myaz_Nuggetz.

  6. Reblogged this on The ancient eavesdropper and commented:

    What is your favorite Alfred Hitchcock Movie? Mine is North by Northwest, an instant classic from the Man of Mystery & Suspense. I also have a thing for Jimmy Stewart in Vertigo, Rear Window & The Man Who Knew Too Much. Hope you are all having a pleasant weekend!

  7. what a clever delight for this old Hitchcock fan

    • Thank you, Paul! I’m glad you enjoyed my Hitchcock-inspired roll of words. It all started after I listened to the repeated shrieks of a train whistle echoing at night while camping a few weeks ago. Just reminded me of the “Psycho” shower scene sound effects. From there, the rest fell into place. What’s your favorite Hitchcock movie? Hope you have a good day, my friend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler 🙂

  8. cate b says:

    The Man Who Knew Too Much…….. que sera sera…….

  9. My favorites are “North by Northwest,” “Vertigo,” and “Shadow of a Doubt.”

    • Very good choices! I’d have to agree. “North by Northwest” and “Vertigo” are probably my top 2 as well (although “Rear Window” is a close 3rd). Hope you have a wonderful day, my friend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler 🙂

  10. Interesting and unique concept. Loved it and love Hitchcock. 🙂

    • Thank you, Elizabeth! Your kind words are much appreciated. Alfred Hitchcock has always captivated this audience of one, time after time he spellbinds my mind! I look forward to following your wonderful, inspiring blog and wish you a relaxing weekend!
      Cheers,
      Tyler 🙂

  11. Reblogged this on Emily Walls Ray's Light and laughter and commented:
    This poem caught my eye because (first, it’s good), and second, because there was another Hitchcock (I think) movie called “The Trouble with Harry,” starring Shirley Maclaine and John Cassavettes which included a song about a train and Tuscaloosa. Does anybody know anything about this? I’d love to get the lyrics.

    • Thank you for your kind words and re-blog, my friend! I don’t know how I could forget this excellent Hitchcock film! It totally fits the theme of this poem! BTW, the song you are referring to was sung by John Forsythe’s character, “Flaggin’ the Train to Tuscaloosa”, and was written by Raymond Scott with words by Mack David. Thank you for reminding me of this, I really appreciate it 🙂

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